Hopefully not dumsor….

For the third evening, our part of Accra and parts of the country have had power cuts. Not too bad tonight, but the last two evenings lights were blinking and power went on and off, not great for anything electrical. My voltage regulator had already been dusted off, after having laptop chargers fried: it keeps the voltage stable when the network fluctuates, only way to charge a laptop safely. The power company changed from ECG to PDS, and while officials say it is not officially dumsor here, the problems are expected to continue for five more days.

Dumsor. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. In Ghana, a dumsor (Akan pronunciation: [dum sɔ] ‘off and on’) is a persistent, irregular, and unpredictable electric power outage. The frequent Ghanaian blackouts are caused by power supply shortage.

Walking home tonight, the roar of generators across our neighborhood reminded me of our first year in Accra when power outages were the norm.  It’s gotten much better since that, so hopefully it’s better by next week. Not that we can complain, at least we have generators and money to run those.

Meanwhile back in Rome, there has been outcry after an overzealous contractor from the capital’s urban decor department painted over the classic “Vota Garibaldi” grafitti from 1948 in our neighborhood yesterday.  The sign is now being restored.

Before:Vota Garibaldi

No-knead November loaf in Garbatella

img_20181120_100108

Heading back to Accra after some days in Rome, in our neighborhood of Garbatella. In Caro Diario, Nanni Moretti drives through this archway on his Vespa. Garbatella is getting trendier, which still seems odd, but is still a great place to live and visit.

img_20181120_100220

Piazza Eurosia in sunshine, with Roman fragments.

img_20181120_100351

Via delle Sette Chiese. Oh yes, and I baked! I actually doubled this and made one big and two small loaves, but here is enough for one.

No-knead loaf in Garbatella

5 grammes fresh yeast (or 3 grammes dry)
425 grams water
100 grammes wholewheat flour
400 grammes white wheat flour
a handful of sunflower seeds
8 grammes salt

Mix all this up, to a shaggy mess and  leave it on kitchen counter with bowl covered for a few hours while you go for apertivi.  When you are back, fold the dough over itself with a spatula for a couple minutes, until you have a firmer dough ball that can be tipped over into parchment paper. Lift that into a bowl or baking tin, cover it and leave in fridge overnight to rise. Next morning, heat oven to 250C and bake for 25-30 minutes. Cool before slicing, and enjoy!
img_20181124_110419

A few days in Garbatella, and a lemon/blackcurrant curd tart

img_20181124_115156

I’ve been in Rome for a week for work, and despite the rain it has been lovely to amble round the neighborhood (Garbatella), drink coffee, meet neighbours tut-tutting over the weather, grafitti and state of the roads, and of course enjoy fall food.

img_20181124_114538

Cavolo nero at the market. And artichokes, broccolo romano, cicoria, mmmm….

img_20181123_181707

Friday night apertivi at the butcher’s up the hill, on Via delle Sette Chiese.

img_20181117_113928

Artichokes at the market: we were on our way to Eataly to see their new IKEA section, interesting. At least a good place to get ziplock bags without going to Anagnina.

Alberto Sordi

Alberto Sordi commemorated on Via Antonio Rubino.

The lemon/blackcurrant curd tart

One shop-bought pastry crust (here, gluten-free pâte brisée)
One jar lemon curd
One jar blackcurrant curd

Blind bake the pastry crust for ten min or so at 200C. I used baking beans. Then pour in the two curd jar contents, and cool until serving.

img_20181121_181445

We bought the blackcurrant curd in Maldon, and it was very nice. The artistic swirl foreseen did not quite work, but this was delicious. Also super easy.

img_20181121_181755