Tag Archives: bread

Oatmeal, rye and wheat bread on a lazy weekend

Accra food

A street sign I passed the other day, heading to the tailor.  Fufu is a popular Ghanaian staple food prepared with plantain and cassava or yam, eaten with soup or sauce. Not dissimilar to sadza or ugali, though those are usually made with maize. Banku is another starchy Ghanaian dish, a mix of fermented corn and cassava dough.  Ghanaian food is tasty, though I find fufu rather on the gloopy side.

A three-day weekend, and no plans…. Friends invited me to the Volta region, but road safety is bad enough here that several hours in holiday traffic was not tempting. No, I do have plans: be home alone, do laundry, read, browse Ravelry, start packing for upcoming work trip, plan holiday knitting, and take stock of my fridge shelf. One thrill after the next, I know. Work is really busy and it is lovely to switch off, to not worry about the clock, and to do some leisurely bread baking.  I had oatmeal for breakfast, and 12 grammes of fresh yeast lurking in a small box, so this bread is being thrown together in an ad hoc way. Time to empty out anything that might spoil or that the the ants might get into while I am away. The next trip is a chance to get exotic things like affordable cheese and celery, sundried tomatoes, biscotti and yes: fresh yeast. There is generally a wishlist from friends as well, so suitcase space for the return trip will be well used.

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This makes a nice sandwich bread, in the Kneippbrød style. Matpakkebrød, as Norwegians would say: “packed lunch bread”, sturdy bread for open-faced sandwiches wrapped in paper. Often one slice with salted butter, Norvegia cheese and a slice of red bell pepper, and one slice with brunost (brown goast cheese) – mmmmmm.

Oatmeal, rye and wheat bread  (3 loaves)

12 grammes fresh yeast (or 6gr dry yeast)
1 litre water
1000 gram plain wheat flour
150 grammes wholewheat flour
150 grammes  coarse rye flour
100 grammes quick cooking oatmeal
1.5 tsp sugar
Last: 25 grammes salt

Crumble the yeast into lukewarm water and stir. Add the rest except salt and stir well: thus will be a shaggy moist dough. If you do not have rye flour, no worries: just use same weight in wholewheat flour. I just figured it was time to break into my precious bag of Norwegian rye flour. After ten minutes, sprinkle salt over dough, then fold dough over itself with a sturdy wooden spoon. Cover and leave to rest in the bowl for an hour (I use a  plastic shower cap to cover the bowl). In a cool kitchen you might need more time.

After an hour, fold the dough again: Using a wooden spoon or a strong spatula, lift and stretch, folding dough over itself, going around the bowl. You’ll see the gluten developing, and the dough becoming more elastic. Leave to rest another hour or so. I am not a great kneader, so seeing how time and higher hydration make up for some of that always makes me happy.

Divide dough into two or three parts, depending on the size of your loaf tins. Line loaf tins with baking parchment. It’s quite a high hydration dough, I did not shape it or tighten edges. Tip dough into loaf tins, and let them rise for the last time, covered with a damp tea towel. The dough should double: at 30C  in Accra, about 40 minutes. Heat the oven to 230C. Bake them on lower shelf for 40 minutes or so, depending on your oven. I baked all three loaves at once.

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This was dinner, with the last episodes of “Alias Grace”, which was excellent.  Next time I I must remember to slash the dough right before it goes into the oven, to avoid cracks on side. Baked loaves freeze well (I cut the loaves in two, so I can pull out a half loaf at a time from the freezer bags.)

 

 

 

 

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“Solrose” bread for terrace drinks

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It’s Easter Monday, andre påskedag in Norway and Pasquetta here in Rome (little Easter), which is often marked locally with a picnic. Lovely sunny day, with a cool breeze, nice on a state holiday, and it’s been very quiet here in Garbatella. Our neighbours upstairs  just got married this weekend, and they have invited the condominium up for celebratory drinks on the rooftop terrace this afternoon. This bread is our contribution.

“Solrose” bread (makes two)

25 grammes fresh yeast
500 ml milk
50 grammes olive oil
2 tbs honey
1/2 tsp salt
50 grammes hulled sunflower seeds (plus some for top)
700 grammes plain wheat flour
50 grammes wholewheat flour

Milk for brushing just before baking (or a beaten egg)
Handful of hulled sunflower seeds

Dissolve the yeast in lukewarm milk. Add everything, fold with a spatula or wooden spoon until it is smooth and you feel a bit of spring. Cover the bowl (plastic shower cap works well) and let it rest for an hour so, until it doubles. It depends how cool your kitchen is. Once doubled: tip the dough out on a lightly floured surface, and divide it in two. This will make two loaves (very handy when  you are heading to drinks at 1830, then dinner elsewhere at 1930…… This also transports well in cake carrier.)

For each half of dough: get your parchment paper ready, and form a round ball for the centre, then roll out a smooth sausage of dough to make a circle around the ball. Maybe 30 cm or so? Pinch the edges together so it is smooth.

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Then cut the ring every two cm or so, to get nice deep slashes right through to the parchment. Cover each sheet with a tea towel and leave to rest another 40 minutes or so, it will rise nicely (above is just rolled out). Heat oven to 220C  (210C if doing one tray at a time). Right before baking, brush lightly with milk and sprinkle with more sunflower seeds.

Bake about 15-20 minutes, until nicely golden. I swapped the trays over after ten minutes to get a more even bake, I might try 210C and fan assist next time.

Note: This is adapted very lightly from “Gjærbakst på alle bord”, 1987. A classic! One of my first cookbooks when I left home for university. The original recipe calls for 50 grammes fresh yeast and much faster rises. You could also use 12.5 grammes dry yeast. Also, the recipe uses margarine rather than oil, and only 700 grammes white flour, but I thought the dough looked a bit wet so I added the wholewheat flour. Normally I’d brush the dough with beaten egg, for more shine, but loaf #2  is coming along for a dinner tonight where someone is allergic to eggs, so I used milk for both.

Tomorrow is my last day in Rome before heading back to Accra: coffee with neighbours,  go see the plumber, have pizza with friends, and in between, the last round of food shopping this time. Cheese, more cheese, celery, and zucchini. With limited fridge space there, there will be more longlife items on this trip: flour, crackers, olives, passata….. it will be shared and enjoyed!

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No-knead seeded bread on Good Friday

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Garbatella! Yes, I am having a Roman Easter, which is very nice indeed. Back for five days to see my husband, which is lovely, and I am making the most of it. So nice to be home in our neighbourhood Garbatella, even with the grafitti and grey skies. Today was all errands: bank, pharmacy to get medication for the next three months, plumbing store to get a new kitchen faucet, with food shopping in between and a stop at the bakery for pizza bianca  and brutti ma buoni biscuits.

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It is 20C here (68F) and many neighborhood dogs are still in coats. Beats me. I keep bumping into neighbours who exclaim “Ma dai! Sei tornata!!”  – you are back! No, not yet, I say.  Many were carrying bags with Easter eggs, which here are large, extravagantly packed and voluminously wrapped. The supermarkets are full of these Easter eggs, as well as colombe, which are like a panettone but shaped like a dove.

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I am working my way through my culinary wishlist for this trip: fresh gnocchi, fresh strawberries, chinotto, pizza margherita, icecream, Aperol Spritz …..  and of course, baking some bread. Such a luxury to do that without sweating! I was thinking of an overnight slow-rise dough, but this is a slow afternoon dough, in between errands, so I upped the yeast a bit. I’ll be baking bread to freeze for my husband, so more one-person loaves.

No-knead seeded bread for Good Friday  (makes 2 medium loaves)

600 ml water
10 grammes fresh yeast (or 5 grammes dry yeast)
600 grammes plain wheat flour (here 00)
200 grammes wholewheat flour (here Italian integrale)

25 grammes flax seeds
2 tsp salt

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Combine the water and yeast, until yeast dissolves. Add flour. Mix in a bowl. After ten minutes, fold in seeds and salt Cover the bowl (I like hotel shower caps) and let it rest countertop in room temperature (20C) three hours. Then, uncover the bowl and fold the dough in the bowl for a couple minutes with a wooden spoon or a spatula, you’ll feel it get stretchier. Line your loaf tins with baking parchment, to make it easier to get the bread out. Now, divide the dough into your loaf tins — maybe 2/3 full, each tin? Depends on loaf tin size, here I divided it by tin sizes (385 g/385g/670g). Cover the tins with a kitchen towels and leave to rise again, for 90 minutes or so.  (If you are in a warm kitchen, maybe an hour). Bake at 230C for 40 minutes until done.

Voila! Not bad. Two small loaves,  and one medium one. I might just take a small one along to as a contribution to tonight’s apertivo at a friend’s house. She always serves nice cheeses and nibbles. Thereafter, out for pasta at a local trattoria. Amatriciana, carbonara, gricia, cacio e pepe….. Choices, choices!

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I also found some crema di pistachio today (like a sweet smooth peanut butter) and am wondering if I could bake with it. Something like cinnamon rolls, but filled with pistachio cream?  It might all just melt and be terrible, it’s not pistachio paste. OR…… (see the lightbulb going off above my head here?) Tomorrow night I am trying out my new Danish cast iron pan for æbleskiver, or munker: pancake puffs. Too hot in Accra to try, so the pan came back to Rome with me. I will report back. Those might be very nice with pistachio cream. To be explored.