Pizza with salsiccia and broccolo romanesco

broccolo romanescoBroccolo romanesco is beautiful, and I have had one in the fridge for several days. I was planning on making pasta with this particular broccolo romanesco, with garlic and peperoncino. After fighting colds all week, ordering Christmas gifts, and running errands, we really fancied pizza, so that’s where the broccolo ended up. I head to Norway soon for an advent weekend to see the family there and drop off presents, hence the need to be organised so early. Hopefully there will be room to bring back Christmas food as well, mmmmm…….

Anyway, pasta with broccoli is super too: see Rachel Eats for an excellent recipe for this, and delightful writing. She has a cookbook coming out next year, which I am sure will be wonderful.

Pizza with salsiccia and broccolo romanesco

image

Pizza dough  (Bonci style)

This is a Gabriele Bonci dough recipe, his pizza is amazing! See video here on how he handles the dough: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKotvbfWdU4   It is in Italian, but just look at his technique and that beautiful dough.

500 grammes plain wheat flour (we used 00, though 0 is recommended)
20 grammes olive oil
3.5 grammes dry yeast
350 grammes water

Later: 10 grammes salt.
2-3 tbs oil, to oil the baking parchment

Mix, leave for an hour, then add salt. My husband uses smoked salt which is just delicious, found in the Mercato Centrale of Florence. Leave dough to rise 6-7 hours at room temperature. You can also leave it overnight in the fridge, 24 hours there is recommended. I confess, we had not planned that far ahead, but 6-7 hours at room temperature worked as well. It will rise and become wonderfully gloppy and elastic. It needs to be handled carefully, to keep the air bubbles in the dough. No rolling pins here.

Topping:
3 salsiccie (nice Italian pork sausages from the butcher down the road)
1/3 of the broccoli romanesco  (which means I can make pasta with the rest tomorrow! yeah!)
Enough grated cheese to cover the pizza base lightly
Pinch of peperoncino (chilli flakes)

I washed and chopped the broccoli into florets, and boiled them until slightly al dente. Take the skins of the sausages and chop into large pieces, and fry then off. This is optional, you could just pop the uncooked sausage meat onto the pizza but the pizza is slightly less greasy this way.

imageMy husband is the pizza master here, and after experimenting, he uses oiled baking parchment. Bonci presses the dough out into an oiled baking tray, but our IKEA oven barely gets to 250C so we pre-heat the oven tray and slide the dough over using the parchment. Here, the dough is just poured out, then eased out using fingers to stretch into a rectangle. The darker bits are just streaks of smoked salt. You want to keep the air bubbles, so gentle is the way to go.

image

When you have the dough stretched out: top with grated cheese. We found a mystery cheese with peperoncino in the freezer (possibly a pecorino) which worked well here.  We toss extra cheese in the freezer before holidays, and excavate it months later and hope for the best. Dot on the sausages and broccoli florets, with chilli flakes if you wish. Then bake at 250C until done (8-12 minutes? Depends on your oven) and enjoy.

My husband does all kinds of topping variations, depending what is in the house: often vegetarian. Patatas bravas, with potato and paprika; roast vegetables; pesto and mozzarella; cheese and onions; tomato and mozzarella; Thai chilli chicken……. All good in different ways: choose the toppings you like. This is a great dough to work from, it is buoyant and tasty. Good for weeknight cooking, as you can do the dough prep the night before, and the toppings can be assembled while the oven heats up. I love thin crunchy Roman pizza, but this one is very good too.

image

As we settled in to having pizza last night while watching TV, I saw police lights and heard shouting. Lo and behold, students from the local school (Socrate) were having a demonstration. Perfectly peaceful, the students were chanting and the police kept traffic out of the way as they students marched. Always something happening in the pizza below.

image

I am bring this to Fiesta Friday #44, a little late but happy to be back. Thanks to the gracious hosts: Angie @ The Novice Gardener,  Prudy @Butter, Basil and Breadcrumbs and Jess @Cooking Is My Sport. Happy first Sunday of Advent to all!

Fiesta Friday

Advertisements

13 thoughts on “Pizza with salsiccia and broccolo romanesco

  1. Ginger

    What an amazing pizza dough! It makes for the perfect backdrop to that beautiful broccoli! I’ll have to check your pizza recipe out soon 🙂

    Reply
    1. krumkaker Post author

      Thanks! It is quite different from rolling a pizza out, but the longer rise and air pockets make this such a good base for whatever you want to top it with.

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Thanksgiving Leftovers Sandwich | Fiesta Friday #44 | The Novice Gardener

  3. Butter, Basil and Breadcrumbs

    Oh my goodness… this pizza looks so delicious. I’m intrigued by the oiled parchment though. Does he bake the pizza on the oiled parchment? So, you had pizza and a show last night (and I don’t mean TV… I mean the demonstration outside!!) I wouldn’t have left the window… but then again, I live in the country, where the most interesting thing going on is an occasional cow mooing… Haha!! Thank you so much for sharing.. I will be trying this pizza dough this week. Such a lovely post.. Happy Fiesta Friday!! ❤

    Reply
    1. krumkaker Post author

      Thanks! Yes, the pizza is baked on the oiled parchment. It should be on the oven tray (oiled) directly, but our oven is not very hot and the pizza seems to puff up better when baked on the pre-heated tray. A pizza stone would be better, I am sure. So the parchment helps slide it over (without burning fingers), for practicality. Countryside quiet sounds wonderful!

      Reply

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s